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Offline Gustavo

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #20 on: Feb 19, 2018, 09:28 PM »
What's that lock TM posted supposed to do? 

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Online TowerMan

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #21 on: Feb 19, 2018, 11:23 PM »
*Originally Posted by Gustavo [+]
What's that lock TM posted supposed to do? 

Gustavo
                         

Details HERE  :123A:

Online stevemersey

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #22 on: Feb 20, 2018, 10:33 PM »
I have had the misfortune to have the garage broken in to and they nearly got away with two bikes but my son and i gave chase and we got both back, though a little damaged.  Fun evening!

Standard up and over doors are pretty hopeless even with extra locks. I had one of those garage defenders that are concreted in the ground, but they managed to force the door off the runners and it was no help.

I think that ground anchors on the inside give the best bangs per buck, but I upgraded the doors, and the best I could find were Hormann sectional for the front and an industrial roller shutter for the rear. The shutter was pretty good value compared to the Hormann and when powder coated, looks smart enough and gives the impression of being secure.

As stated, parking the car hard against the door is simple and free, and a good practice.


Offline mike5100

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #23 on: Feb 21, 2018, 08:18 AM »
*Originally Posted by stevemersey [+]
I have had the misfortune to have the garage broken in to and they nearly got away with two bikes but my son and i gave chase and we got both back, though a little damaged.  Fun evening!

Standard up and over doors are pretty hopeless even with extra locks. I had one of those garage defenders that are concreted in the ground, but they managed to force the door off the runners and it was no help.

I think that ground anchors on the inside give the best bangs per buck, but I upgraded the doors, and the best I could find were Hormann sectional for the front and an industrial roller shutter for the rear. The shutter was pretty good value compared to the Hormann and when powder coated, looks smart enough and gives the impression of being secure.

As stated, parking the car hard against the door is simple and free, and a good practice.
That's an interesting idea about the roller shutter rear door.  It's probably the weak point for me.  Do you know the make Steve?  I was also considering the plastic rooflights and thinking that some metal bars bolted to the metals rafters in that area might give the yobs pause for thought.
Mike

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #24 on: Feb 21, 2018, 10:19 AM »
*Originally Posted by mike5100 [+]
That's an interesting idea about the roller shutter rear door.  It's probably the weak point for me.  Do you know the make Steve?  I was also considering the plastic rooflights and thinking that some metal bars bolted to the metals rafters in that area might give the yobs pause for thought.
Mike
Mike

If you have a secondary access you can covertly secure your main up and over garage door by utilising the 4 off transport bolt holes that hold the door to is frame but use 4 off long screws and screw the door and frame to the wooden frame / brickwoork
Then in the dark they won't be able to see easily what is holding the door shut.

For the skylights and the rear door, some door / window bars securely fixed to the outside or inside.

Also make the side door outward opening (with a weak handel that comes off easily if pulled) with a substantial frame, as it is harder to break open  a door and cannot be kicked in.
 
Richard
« Last Edit: Feb 21, 2018, 10:23 AM by TowerMan »
                         

Details HERE  :123A:

Offline 78 Bravo

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #25 on: Feb 21, 2018, 11:56 AM »
It seems that everyone's talking about the same stuff here, but I want to add one more point to the discussion, as follows.

Security is a trade-off. It is a trade off between, inter alia convenience, cost, risk, and perceived threat. As has already been said, it is possible to increase the security at low cost (such as parking a car in front of the door (assuming you already have the car)). However, this decreases the convenience - you need to move the car. You could store the bike inside an underground bunker which, while mitigating threat and apparently decreasing risk, increases costs. You could have the perception of security - security theatre - which may make you feel better, and it also may decrease risk, with only marignal loss of convenience and cost (things like dummy alarms / cctv cameras fall into this category). You could put metal bars over the sky lights to prevent entry, or you could use a blanket to prevent sight.

The final trade off you accept will, in part, depend on the threat you perceive. Have you checked to see what the actual threat is? What is the crime rate in the area. What form does it take? Is arson, perhaps, a bigger threat than theft?

Convenience:
1) how often do you use your bike?
2) How long are your rides vs how long does it take to get on the bike (there's no point spending 20minutes getting ready for a 5 min spin to the shops).
3) How many keys are you carrying? What if you lose a key? How much will it cost to replace a lock?

Cost:
1) how much is the bike worth to you?
2) what is your excess?
3) what is the most likely cost differential with a theft claim if it is stolen?
4) how much damage will be caused to the garage if a determined thief attempts break in - what's your excess on this policy?
5) What's your total exposure?
6) How much is "convenience" worth?
7) How much will you spend on security?

And so forth...

All in all, it warrants a detailed analysis before making any decisions. There are many tools available to help you undertake your analysis, if you're interested.

Offline Craigasaki

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #26 on: Feb 21, 2018, 05:20 PM »
*Originally Posted by 78 Bravo [+]
It seems that everyone's talking about the same stuff here, but I want to add one more point to the discussion, as follows.

Security is a trade-off. It is a trade off between, inter alia convenience, cost, risk, and perceived threat. ....

And so forth...

All in all, it warrants a detailed analysis before making any decisions. There are many tools available to help you undertake your analysis, if you're interested.

Good grief Bravo, i'll just buy a Goose  :016:
More tea, no biscuits

Offline Gustavo

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #27 on: Feb 21, 2018, 05:49 PM »
I think you guys would be better served by funding your police forces better.  I know the cottage industry around security wouldn't like that, but if people didn't get away with stealing your shit as easily, you wouldn't need 10 locks and an armed guard protecting your garage...      :211:

I may have mentioned this before, but I don't even think about people breaking into my garage.  What's more, several times a year (typically in summer when we are working outside in the back yard until late) we have gone to sleep with the garage door open.  Yes, not unlocked, wide open and it faces the street.  There was nothing missing in the garage (two cars, two motorcycles, bicycles, tools etc.) the next morning. 

And this, despite the fact that Mexico is sending us all it's worst people...   :008:

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline Siberman

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #28 on: Feb 21, 2018, 06:03 PM »
*Originally Posted by Gustavo [+]
I think you guys would be better served by funding your police forces better.  I know the cottage industry around security wouldn't like that, but if people didn't get away with stealing your shit as easily, you wouldn't need 10 locks and an armed guard protecting your garage...      :211:

I may have mentioned this before, but I don't even think about people breaking into my garage.  What's more, several times a year (typically in summer when we are working outside in the back yard until late) we have gone to sleep with the garage door open.  Yes, not unlocked, wide open and it faces the street.  There was nothing missing in the garage (two cars, two motorcycles, bicycles, tools etc.) the next morning. 

And this, despite the fact that Mexico is sending us all it's worst people...   :008:

Gustavo
Good point, however I think we do fund our police force well. Both of them.
I'm sorry, really bad reception here, you said your name was Dr. who?

Online stevemersey

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Re: Garage security
« Reply #29 on: Feb 21, 2018, 06:33 PM »
*Originally Posted by Gustavo [+]
I think you guys would be better served by funding your police forces better.  I know the cottage industry around security wouldn't like that, but if people didn't get away with stealing your shit as easily, you wouldn't need 10 locks and an armed guard protecting your garage...      :211:

I may have mentioned this before, but I don't even think about people breaking into my garage.  What's more, several times a year (typically in summer when we are working outside in the back yard until late) we have gone to sleep with the garage door open.  Yes, not unlocked, wide open and it faces the street.  There was nothing missing in the garage (two cars, two motorcycles, bicycles, tools etc.) the next morning. 

And this, despite the fact that Mexico is sending us all it's worst people...   :008:

Gustavo

To be fair, there are many places in the UK that leaving the door open is still OK, just not in the cities. Overall US crime is about half the UK's, which I guess is either the lower population density or the fact you lock so many people up.