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Offline Gustavo

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #10 on: Jan 08, 2019, 06:42 PM »
*Originally Posted by Wal [+]

only 11years on a battery, you'll have to tighten up your maintenance schedule...... :211: :015:

I was thinking I need to stretch that new one to 12 years to break that record.  But I am not sure I'll keep the Versys long enough to see that through...   :notsure:

Gustavo
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Online TallTex

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #11 on: Jan 08, 2019, 07:43 PM »
The most ambitious environmental proposals in the US call for the end of fossil fuel use for transportation in twelve years.

For years I have looked at my '05 Nissan Sentra and thought, this could literally be my last internal combustion car. Then I consider my bikes and think, oh my, don't let them become unusable, don't let fueling them become unaffordable or illegal... not yet, not yet!

Then I remember that the world once ran on coal or wood-fired steam, and horse and buggy. And before that, ox and cart. And the world was forced to abandon technology that was all it had known. It's not that it won't happen again... it's only when.  :notsure:

Nor am I closed to the electric motorbike or car, given a proper serviceable battery and motor. But like all of us, I am so invested in gasoline dreams.  :33:
« Last Edit: Jan 08, 2019, 07:47 PM by TallTex »
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Offline Gustavo

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #12 on: Jan 09, 2019, 05:28 PM »
I have no doubt that prediction could turn out to be true, we may not be running any ICE cars or bikes in 12 years.  I wasn't thinking about that aspect of life when I said I probably won't have the Versys that long. 

If my transportation needs weren't split between two cities and I could justify buying a new car to have at home, I would have bought an electric car already.  I am not against electric bikes either, except that at the current state of technology it seems you can't get much past 100 mile range and while that could work for a commuter (which I don't use a bike for), that really doesn't cover my weekend riding.  But once a bike for the right range comes along, I wouldn't be opposed to having one of those either.

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Online TallTex

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #13 on: Jan 09, 2019, 06:08 PM »
The environmental footprint from suddenly recycling the world's internal combustion fleet would be devastating in itself. I expect we will see some bridge technologies to help fully wear out the IC fleet, like cracking water with electrolysis into Brown's gas, or some other way to convert gasoline/diesel engines to burn hydrogen. This has been possible for years from an engineering standpoint, just not from a political one.

If the transition is handled well, these could be exciting times. If not, there's hell to pay...  :lostit:
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Offline Wal

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #14 on: Jan 09, 2019, 09:18 PM »
*Originally Posted by TallTex [+]
The environmental footprint from suddenly recycling the world's internal combustion fleet would be devastating in itself. I expect we will see some bridge technologies to help fully wear out the IC fleet, like cracking water with electrolysis into Brown's gas, or some other way to convert gasoline/diesel engines to burn hydrogen. This has been possible for years from an engineering standpoint, just not from a political one.

If the transition is handled well, these could be exciting times. If not, there's hell to pay...  :lostit:



and, the ICE engine designers still have a few tricks left up their sleeves, this Nissan engine moves the development on a bit....and if fitted with  digitally controlled valves would be more interesting :1:

Offline Gustavo

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #15 on: Jan 10, 2019, 11:49 PM »
Yes, there still are some developments possible.  IMHO, Mazda's Skyactive-X design is next big step, if they can make it work reliably, it promisses to have the efficiency of a diesel w/o any of the negative environmental impacts:



Gustavo
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Offline Ted99UK

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #16 on: Jan 11, 2019, 08:39 AM »
*Originally Posted by TallTex [+]
The environmental footprint from suddenly recycling the world's internal combustion fleet would be devastating in itself. I expect we will see some bridge technologies to help fully wear out the IC fleet, like cracking water with electrolysis into Brown's gas, or some other way to convert gasoline/diesel engines to burn hydrogen. This has been possible for years from an engineering standpoint, just not from a political one.

If the transition is handled well, these could be exciting times. If not, there's hell to pay...  :lostit:

Never heard of Browns gas. Just Googled it.
Electrolysis of water producing Hydrogen.

Ted.

Online TallTex

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #17 on: Jan 11, 2019, 04:48 PM »
As I understand it, the limitation of water electrolysis is that the energy input in electrical current to crack the water is as much as the energy obtained by combustion of the H2 and O as a fuel gas. Well. That seems to be a matter of the efficiency of the cracking process and the combustion process. Ways are being developed to crack water with less and less electric current.

As with the Mazda engine shown above, the burning side of the process can also be fine tuned... though perhaps not easily done with some sort of conversion of engines designed to burn petroleum. But something purpose built for H and O holds promise.

The astonishing thing, though, is here is a system with water in, and heat and water out as the only combustion byproducts. Doesn't even have to be clean water... it can be sea water, sewage, piss, soda pop. Only pure water drips out the tail pipe. Otherwise wasted heat can be recovered for other uses.

If it can be made to work, it promises nothing less than a new world.  :007:
« Last Edit: Jan 11, 2019, 04:49 PM by TallTex »
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Offline Gustavo

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Re: 11 years
« Reply #18 on: Jan 11, 2019, 05:40 PM »
*Originally Posted by TallTex [+]
As I understand it, the limitation of water electrolysis is that the energy input in electrical current to crack the water is as much as the energy obtained by combustion of the H2 and O as a fuel gas. Well. That seems to be a matter of the efficiency of the cracking process and the combustion process. Ways are being developed to crack water with less and less electric current.

Actually, it takes more energy to generate the hydrogen than you get back from the combustion process due to normal inefficiencies in both processes.  The question is what process and source of energy are used to generate the hydrogen and can that sometimes still make it worth it.  Also, fuel cells are more efficient than ICE, so if we want to use hydrogen as "fuel", using it in fuel cells would be a more efficient way to recover the energy.

Gustavo

Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton