Versys Forum

Please login or register.

News: Join Now ! Members have access to areas that guests cannot see.



Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: International Versys Meet - North American Edition - Truro, NS, Canada  (Read 2521 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Bart

  • Versys God
  • *****
  • Posts: 2977
  • City / Town: West Wales
  • Country: 00
Enjoying the "live" RR guys    :031: :031: :031:

So how did the V1k do Gus ?
RD250, XJ600, VFR750, CBR900, Honet 600, RD400, RD350 YPVS, CBR600 Sport, DRZ400, XT660R, BMW R1100RS, Versys 650, CBR1000RR, Versys 650, AdvVersys 650, CB1300S, VF1000, MkII V1k, XT1200ZE

Online TowerMan

  • Information Guru
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 7727
  • V.I.G.S. rules OK
  • Bike: Mk1V650 & Mk2V1k
  • City / Town: Biggar, Scotland
  • Country: scotland
*Originally Posted by Bart [+]
So how did the V1k do Gus ?
Bart

I bet he is now lost for words in realising what a fool he has been in delaying upgrading to the more superior V1k Mk2, in the best possible colour  :7:

not that I biased but .............................  :008:
Richard    :001: 
         

Offline TallTex

  • Versys Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 226
  • Bike: KLZ1000LT
  • City / Town: DFW TX
  • Country: us
You're not biased, sir. Facts is facts.  :008: :031:

G2Ergo throttle tube, Givi Airflow screen, Dan Moto carbon fiber exhaust, Grip Puppies, Moto Werk bar risers, Kaw rad guard

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6633
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
The V1K?  Do you guys really want to know...?   :notsure:

The engine and transmission are fantastic.  No, I mean, FANTASTIC.  Really.  It will pull from 2500 RPM in 6th if you don't feel like shifting.  It will pull your arms out if you give it gas like you mean it.  All the while shifting up and down the gearbox with a precision and smoothness not a lot of bikes I have ridden recently offer.  For a bike this size (and Rob's seems bigger than most with the sky high seat he has, see comment about 1st class accommodations earlier) it handles rather well when it starts moving.  But that's about it.

The suspension is disappointing.  I mean, it's no better than that of the 650, meaning, still too harsh to be reasonable for anybody that doesn't fill his days eating ice cream...   :whistle:  And there is no compression adjustment, so backing up the rebound only does so much.  Seriously, I was expecting the V1K to be better tuned, but in hindsight, I think I had read some of you guys complain about the suspension too and having to do the same modifications as on the 650.  I know this is subjective, but the bike is big and ugly.  No, I mean UGLY.  Really, once you get past the generic front of the fairing/headlights, it's a mess of angles and black plastic.  Shame on Kawasaki (the Mk3 650 isn't a lot better, just sans the black plastic that hides part of the I-4 and airbox). 

I suppose that if you were planning a trans-continental adventure, this would be a an excellent mile-muncher for such a trip, similar to the V-Strom 1K I used to have.  And with the same shortcomings.  Despite the mechanical refinement, it lacks the character that makes the smaller brethren such appealing bikes.  Ridden back to back with Rob's well used Mk1 650, you realize the 650 vibrates more, doesn't have nearly the same ability to shorten time-space, the gearbox is clunky even after 240,000 km, yet it's a lot more appealing.  More fun to ride.  It handles better with minimal suspension maintenance (Rob still runs the OEM shock, w/o ever having serviced it... :192:).  It also has none the wind noise/turbulence the V1K had, but that's more down to Rob's choice of barn doors, rather than any fault of the bike's.

Let me put it this way.  Rob asked me if he rode out west next year on the V1K I would swap him my Mk1 for it.  The answer was he would have to ride the V1K back home.  There is no way I'm giving up my Mk1 for it...   :211:

Hey, you asked...    :008:

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline uralrob

  • Versys Mega God
  • ******
  • Posts: 9908
  • Bike: 08 V 650 15 V1k
  • City / Town: Bridgewater NS
  • Country: ca
 Another hijacked thread - V1K evaluation on the 650 forum Ride Report board.  :008: :008:.

 Getting back on topic just for a moment  :whistle: we had a decent ride up from C. Geriatric to Cheticamp, Cape Breton - see map below - under sunny then cloudy conditions but not the afternoon rain expected.
 Tomorrow we do the Cabot Trail with Gustavo leading to cut back on the constant whining about not stopping enough for picture taking  :2:. Decent forecast for that as well as for Wednesday when we'll probably do part of northern N.S. on the way back to C. Geriatric on Thursday. Much will depend on what the changeable weather does. We've been lucky so far.

  https://goo.gl/maps/A4fQqVNVi1xMvaSf6

 Map correction:  the route shows us taking a shortcut from Livingstone Cove to Ballantynes Cove. In fact we followed 337 around the point and visited the lighthouse as per Gustavo's pic. So it did happen  :2: .

  Although quite direct on the map, most of the roads to the n.e. of Halifax had some nice curves, better pavement than yesterday, minimal traffic, and only a few squawking chickens and errant kids. We managed to miss the latter and kept up a decent pace. Average speed was 84.4 kph, maximum was 134,5 kph.

 Rob.
« Last Edit: Jun 25, 2019, 03:03 AM by uralrob »
Don't take Life too serious, it's not permanent.

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6633
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
Given that IVM participation was down to Rob and myself, after everyone else slowly cancelled their plans, we decided to skip staying in Truro and head straight for the Cabot Trail today.  The window of good weather is supposed to last until Wednesday, no point in wasting valuable riding time on meandering across the province.

Two good bikes ready to leave bright and early:



Chasing Rob east:



In order to make good time, Rob's route took us on a bit of highway today.  But, to avoid some dreaded construction zones on some highways, we detoured around Peggy's Cove, where we passed by this store (Hi Dave!   :152:):



I can't remember when I last saw so many bodies of water one after the other.  Bays, coves, lakes, rivers, everywhere you turn there is one more you hadn't seen or visited yet.  It never gets old.  Maybe you guys will eventually get tired of these pics...  :008:



Is this what dual citizenship looks like in Canada?



On the road, with that red Mk1:



It was nice and sunny when we started around Rob's place.  It got progressively darker as we headed east.  it also got quite a bit chillier.  But, we only saw a light sprinkle all day.  Good riding weather, if not ideal for on-the-fly pics due to the low light conditions...    :138:


Still chasing Rob:



Rob stopped for gas near the Halifax airport.  Seemed an odd choice to me initially.  In the US, gas prices are always higher by the airport (you have to return the rental car full...   :125:) and they are always very busy.  This one was neither.  The price was the same as we had paid elsewhere on the peninsula and it wasn't that busy.  And, it was just by one of the better roads we road so far.  The pavement was in great shape (something that can't be said about many roads in this province   :33:) and it was like riding a roller coaster...   :biker1: :biker1:


But, you can't completely avoid "construction season":



Yes, I am here:



Airsaig Marina:





Did he see his shadow when he came out of hibernation? 



Airsaig Lighthouse:



Unfortunately, it was closed today:



Still chasing Rob, this time, around the north shore of Nova Scotia:





We finally made it to the tip of the peninsula - Cape George:



Did you guys know Jim was hiding this from us?   :notsure:


 :008:


To help the suspension, we stopped here for ice cream:





We stopped for gas only once today.  For some reason  :whistle:, the Mk1 is always using less gas than the Mk2.   :211:

And before you know it, we are at Canso Causeway:


Looking north:



The channel (and bridge) looked small to me, for the type of ship traffic I was expecting here.  Rob claims it's larger than it seems and you can see sizable ships using it...    :notsure:



And we finally are at the Cape Breton coast:






This is where we'll be spending the night:



Hard to believe he just rode past this ice cream place...



Cheticamp, NS:



We had an excellent dinner at the Harbour Restaurant:





Rob was very interested in this Canadian Coast Guard cutter:



The marina:






Alright, that's it for tonight.  Now I have to go to work.


Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6633
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
Rob picked Cheticamp to spend the night before doing the Cabot Trail, as it's at the entrance to the park and you get a jump on all other traffic by starting early.   We are still about a couple of weeks away from the high season around here, so traffic wasn't that bad even after taking a very leisurely ride through the park.

We started from the west end, going north then east - The Cabot Trail:






Rob swears these deer are out to get him... :015:



French Lake:





McKenzie River:






As I mentioned before, this is also road construction season.  Several sections of the trail were torn up for repairs.  You had grooved pavement, gravel (section both short and long), automatic traffic controls and/or pilot cars to deal with.







I have heard many stories about riding the Cabot Trail over the years.  Often, they mention how one "managed to ride it".  I was assuming this would be a very scenic ride with some very difficult twisty sections of road going up and down the cliffs.  In reality, it's mostly a very tame road, with only a few (relatively short) interesting riding sections.  Rob says that most people that talk about "managing it" have never been to the western US and therefore this is a tough road for them...

But like I said, there are some good sections:





We made a short detour into Neils Harbour:







We had a good lunch at Clacking Hen.  And "we" decided to get some culture into this trip.  The French had a large fortress on the northeast side of Cape Breton called Fortress of Louisbourg.  It had long been abandoned, but was excavated and reconstructed by the Canadian govt in the late 60's.  It took us a little of Rob'r original course, but I dragged him kicking and screaming to get some history and culture into this trip...   :192:

Seal Island Bridge:







And before you know it, we were in Louisbourg.  TBC.

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline uralrob

  • Versys Mega God
  • ******
  • Posts: 9908
  • Bike: 08 V 650 15 V1k
  • City / Town: Bridgewater NS
  • Country: ca

 Here's the map link for today, Tuesday.     

  https://goo.gl/maps/QM1gvRJtKgaKQHX87

  Gustavo is working on the report now.

 Rob.

 
Don't take Life too serious, it's not permanent.

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6633
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
Louisbourg was a fortified town built by the French in the beginning of the 1700's.  It served as a base for the cod fishing industry and a hub trading.  The English apparently didn't like that French stronghold in the area (really?  That was a big surprise...  :008:), and attacked it repeatedly until in 1758 it fell for a second time and was demolished.  OK, that was a bit drastic.  I mean, it was a nice town by the looks of it.  Couldn't they have re purposed it?    :027:  Anyway, it ended up providing lots of much needed jobs in the area when the Canadian government decided to do an archaeological project that included reconstructing the fortress as a museum. 

Read more about it here:
https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/ns/louisbourg/decouvrir-discover/histoire-history

Today it's a really nice historical site with some actors re-enacting life in the fortress.  Sometimes reenactments can be a bit cheesy, but I got the impression these people take their job very seriously, they provided interesting historical context to what it was like living there (stuff you'd have to read on a plaque or guide book otherwise).  And they made it fun.

The Queen's Gate and guard:


This moat has seen better days... 


The Queen's gate:



Louisbourg:







I was thinking they'd either shoot the Brit or chain him and whip him like the red coat (literally) he is:








The original town was about 44 blocks.  Only 4 have been reconstructed.


Fisherman trader:



Inn for the proletariat:






We're at war:



The soldiers' chapel:



Barracks:



The governor's kitchen:







The governor's dining room:



His bedroom:



After about 2 hours at Louisbourg, we started making out way west.  We took a short cut to avoid the main highway.  Rob had never ridden these roads before, so we didn't know what to expect.  It turned out to be one of the best riding sections of this trip.  The roads along the rivers/lakes/ocean were nice both in design and scenery.  Some sections reminded us that we were still in NS and the pavement was well, well, past the replacement date.  OTOH, it meandered up and down across beautiful scenery, with nicely varying corners.  It was mostly cloudy, so none of the on-the-fly shots came out worthy of posting due to the low light. 

We made pretty good time to St Peter's.  After checking in, we had a nice dinner at the hotel's pub. 



After dinner we went for a walk along the St Peter's Canal (which is celebrating its 150th anniversary) to see how its changed since Rob last sailed past it.








Tomorrow's plan depends on the weather, which unfortunately doesn't look too promising.  Stay tuned...     :biker1: :biker1:

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6633
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
The weather forecast has been constantly changing.  We decided that today would be a loosely planned day with several routing options based on what we encountered as the day wore on.

One shot I didn't get last night because it was too dark by the time we finished dinner - Bras d'Or Lake, where we spent the night:



We started by visiting Isle Madam and Petit-de-Grat.  Both islands off the southeastern coast of Cape Breton (which of course, is an island in and by itself).  The weather here seems to be quite severe in winter, there is some farming, but like many other places, fishing seems to be the main industry.

We made our way to Petit-de-Grat and Rob immediately found a path leading to the island's edge to go explore:



Note how the trees are sparse and small.  Harsh winters.



Off the eastern coast:



Thinking man.



We started making our way west.  As has been our habit earlier in the trip, when all else fails, there is always Tim's for lunch...



Weather was surprisingly warm, but the forecast said it wouldn't last.  We made a detour north through Pictou, Seafoam, Tatamagouche and finally went through Truro.  At that point, it was obvious that the nice weather was about to end, we decided to head back toward Bridgewater.  If we have to spend a day holed up somewhere waiting for the storm to pass, might as well be at Chateau Geriatric...

One thing never changes, I spend my days chasing "do these bags make my butt look fat?" Rob:






Shortly after that last pic was taken, the skies opened up and it we got a free bike and gear wash.   About time too, I really needed to do something about those dead bugs on my face-shield.   :008:

Made it ro Rob's around 5 PM.  There may be a good weather patch further west tomorrow, so we could be out again sooner than we thought.

Later,

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton