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Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: It just occurred to me: bike must not be in gear when adjusting chain  (Read 1707 times)

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Offline Dilbert

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*Originally Posted by Stewie [+]
The chain in that picture is over 30 years old.
It has lived in an oil bath all its life and only sees the light of day every 6months.

How do you lubricate a chain in a nuclear environment (clue, oil vapourises)  :008:
Just passin' through

Offline Dilbert

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*Originally Posted by jkristjan [+]
It just puzzles me that a manual which goes to the length to specify that you should do this procedure on sidestand only does not say that you should also take up slack on the top run.

You don't tension the top run, the front sprocket rotates and pulls the top run into full tension, the bottom run hangs by gravity without any direct tension, you take up slack in the bottom run to stop it slapping about and potentially skipping off the bottom section of the rear sprocket.

If you overtighten the chain at the bottom run then by the time it gets to the top it's effectively too short/ tight and will either wear rapidly, snap through the sideplates, or bend the front sprocket teeth.
Just passin' through

Offline uralrob

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 More likely take out the bearing before bending the sprocket teeth.

 Rob.
Don't take Life too serious, it's not permanent.

Offline Dilbert

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*Originally Posted by uralrob [+]

 More likely take out the bearing before bending the sprocket teeth.

 Rob.

Yeah, another one to watch out for, tends to hook the top of the sprocket teeth rather than bend the whole tooth, chains don't generally snap just because they're tight, but any other weakness like stress fractures in the side plates and they will go.

Best to find the tight spots and adjust for those rather than risk any further damage  :028:
Just passin' through