Versys Forum

Please login or register.

News: Join Now ! Members have access to areas that guests cannot see.



Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: yss shock  (Read 863 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Krisnow

  • Versys Member
  • **
  • Posts: 22
  • Bike: Versys 650
  • City / Town: Ko Samui
  • Country: th
Re: yss shock
« Reply #10 on: Nov 17, 2020, 08:20 AM »
*Originally Posted by Gustavo [+]
Sag should be set as a proportion of total travel.  Since teh Versys has longer travel suspension than a typical road bike, the sage should be larger too.  For normal use, somewhere between 35-51 mm.  That puts you in a good position to allow the suspension to do its work in both directions.  Obviously, if you go with more sag, your travel in compression is decreased and you run the risk of bottoming out more easily/frequesntly.  But, if you are doing that because the spring is too stiff for your weight, it's less likely to happen.

Gustavo

thanks. my sag is much too big for what is usually suggested.  i usually ride alone, but recently I drove with my female companion and all the boxes on, and did not experience any bottoming out.  so i kind of question that theory... I find that fitting softer springs is actually a cheaper way to lower the bike.  by the way, could you explain what is topping out?

Offline Gustavo

  • Hardcore Member
  • Versys Mega God
  • *
  • Posts: 6896
  • Wanna be moto magazine writer
  • Bike: Classic Red
Re: yss shock
« Reply #11 on: Nov 17, 2020, 03:41 PM »
You are not going to bottom out the suspension on every ride, even if your sag is greater than that recommended range, especially when you have a stiff spring.  It only means the spring is too stiff for your weight, if it still works with a passenger and luggage w/o having to increase preload.   It's not a theory.  It's pretty basic math and physics.    :016:

Topping out is when the shock or fork gets to be fully extended.  It usually means that you ran out of suspension travel in extension and your wheel is about to leave the ground at that point. 


Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

Offline uralrob

  • Versys Mega God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10452
  • Bike: 14 V 650 15 V1k
  • City / Town: Bridgewater NS
  • Country: ca
Re: yss shock
« Reply #12 on: Nov 17, 2020, 06:51 PM »


 Topping out - aka taking the air  :2: .

 Rob.
Don't take Life too serious, it's not permanent.

Offline Krisnow

  • Versys Member
  • **
  • Posts: 22
  • Bike: Versys 650
  • City / Town: Ko Samui
  • Country: th
Re: yss shock
« Reply #13 on: Nov 18, 2020, 12:42 AM »
*Originally Posted by Gustavo [+]
You are not going to bottom out the suspension on every ride, even if your sag is greater than that recommended range, especially when you have a stiff spring.  It only means the spring is too stiff for your weight, if it still works with a passenger and luggage w/o having to increase preload.   It's not a theory.  It's pretty basic math and physics.    :016:

Topping out is when the shock or fork gets to be fully extended.  It usually means that you ran out of suspension travel in extension and your wheel is about to leave the ground at that point. 

thanks, but the fact that my rider's sag is higher than usual means that my spring is not harder but softer, hence it compresses further.  I got a softer spring to lower the bike.


Gustavo

Offline Krisnow

  • Versys Member
  • **
  • Posts: 22
  • Bike: Versys 650
  • City / Town: Ko Samui
  • Country: th
Re: yss shock
« Reply #14 on: Nov 18, 2020, 01:55 AM »
I meant, how does topping out actually feel or how to identify that it is happening?  bottomming out can be felt as the shock hits its bottom.   my rear shock has softer spring than OEM hence my sag is bigger than recommended. I ordered softer spring to lower the bike, which I found as a cheaper way of achieving this goal; i can now not just flat-foot, but having my knees slightly bent when having my feet on the ground.  one can of course order a shorter rear shock, but here I did not have this option.  even though YSS has a nut that allows to shorten the shock by 5mm or so.