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Online Topbox

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Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« on: Jan 25, 2022, 03:39 AM »
While I'm still working on project 650 for possible adventures when travel opens up I often cycle through available adventure tyres. I never ride off paved roads so adventure tyres are new to me so I'm learning all the way, I think my needs will be between 60/40 and 80/20 Road dirt ratio.

Size seems to be an issue with 17 ins wheels and so the Continental TKC70 keeps rising to the top. However, seeing a recent review of the Mitas E 07 has put that in the frame with mileage rates, BUT, their front size is 120 90 17 as opposed to 120 70 17 as standard. 

My question is would the 90 section clear or foul the standard fender.

Any help opinions and comments appreciated

Thanks,
TB


Offline TowerMan

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #1 on: Jan 25, 2022, 01:48 PM »
*Originally Posted by Topbox [+]
While I'm still working on project 650 for possible adventures when travel opens up I often cycle through available adventure tyres. I never ride off paved roads so adventure tyres are new to me so I'm learning all the way, I think my needs will be between 60/40 and 80/20 Road dirt ratio.

Size seems to be an issue with 17 ins wheels and so the Continental TKC70 keeps rising to the top. However, seeing a recent review of the Mitas E 07 has put that in the frame with mileage rates, BUT, their front size is 120 90 17 as opposed to 120 70 17 as standard. 

My question is would the 90 section clear or foul the standard fender.

Any help opinions and comments appreciated

Thanks,
TB
From the remarks I have seen on the V . Com site, the 120 90 17 will foul the front mudguard, but you can easily make extension brackets to make it clear / and not gundge up with mud under the mudguard  :028:
Richard    :001: 

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #2 on: Jan 25, 2022, 04:36 PM »
*Originally Posted by TowerMan [+]
From the remarks I have seen on the V . Com site, the 120 90 17 will foul the front mudguard, but you can easily make extension brackets to make it clear / and not gundge up with mud under the mudguard  :028:

Good man, thanks for the info I'll take a look at that.

I'll be checking the fender extender as well. I can see how extension brackets will lift it vertically  away from the tyre increasing clearance but the fender extender may possibly be lifted up not away from the tyre

Cheers
TB




Offline Gustavo

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #3 on: Jan 25, 2022, 05:11 PM »
The E-07 doesn't have a front tire that fits a 17" rim.  The tire you are looking at is meant to be used in the rear, where 120/90-17 is a common size.  Not that it can't work, but the profile is different than that of a front tire and it results in slower steering and corresponding handling.  On a bike like the Versys it may not be that bad, it steers very quickly as setup from the factory, so maybe you can live with it.  But it will be different.

Also, the E-07 is a hard compound meant to be long lasting tire, so while you will read about how great the longevity is and some people claim it even handles pretty well, there is no free lunch, it won't handle like a sport-touring or a 90/10 adventure-touring tire.  Especially not when it's cold and wet.

You have to think about the actual riding you are going to do and choose tires accordingly.  If you are going to do some dirt/gravel roads occasionally, you don't need a 50/50 tire.  Yes, they will make that 2% of your riding a bit easier, but you will lose performance everywhere else.  Even a 60/40 tires is very off-road oriented for what you described.  Add to that the problem that the definition of what is a 50/50 vs 60/40 or 70/30 is very fuzzy.  You'll see tires like the Bridgstone AX41, Continental TKC-80, Dunlop Trailmax Mission, Pirelli Scorpion STR, etc. all defined in that 60/40 to 50/50 range, yet looking at them, you will see very different designs and tread patterns.  All good tires if you ride A LOT of dirt.  All are going to wear very quickly on prolonged tarmac excursions.

Continental TKC-70s are a good option, they are a lot more road oriented, they perform really well wet or dry and seem to last as well as any adventure touring tire I've used.  Another option is Shinko's 705 series.  They come it the right size in the front (120/70-17) but you have to go with a narrower/taller rear (150/70-17).  I've ran that on my Versys (several different tires) and I actually prefer the narrower rear.

Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #4 on: Jan 25, 2022, 06:50 PM »
 :86:

Thanks for the detailed reply. Well spotted RE e 07 being a rear tyre.

Looks like TKC70 has risen back to the top

TB


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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #5 on: Jan 25, 2022, 09:55 PM »
If you are not going off tarmac, I see no logical reason, to have anything other than sports touring tyres fitted.
What would you rather be, or a wasp?

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #6 on: Jan 26, 2022, 11:58 AM »
*Originally Posted by 100milesaway [+]
If you are not going off tarmac, I see no logical reason, to have anything other than sports touring tyres fitted.

I said I haven't ridden off road so far. But if I can get all my ducks in a row then Chile and Alaska here I come. Where paved roads are not guaranteed. AND, if they get muddy then with street tyres they will be impossible.

That is what project 650 is all about.

For European riding I'll take my Versys 1000.

TB
« Last Edit: Jan 26, 2022, 12:00 PM by Topbox »

Offline TowerMan

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #7 on: Jan 26, 2022, 12:36 PM »
*Originally Posted by Topbox [+]
I said I haven't ridden off road so far. But if I can get all my ducks in a row then Chile and Alaska here I come. Where paved roads are not guaranteed. AND, if they get muddy then with street tyres they will be impossible.

That is what project 650 is all about.

For European riding I'll take my Versys 1000.

TB
If you want to see a Versys project bike that fits the type of roads you want to do in the Americas, have a look at the bikes JDRocks has built for himself.
All detailed on the V . Com site over the past 5 years 😎😎😎👍
Richard    :001: 

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #8 on: Jan 26, 2022, 12:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by TowerMan [+]
If you want to see a Versys project bike that fits the type of roads you want to do in the Americas, have a look at the bikes JDRocks has built for himself.
All detailed on the V . Com site over the past 5 years 😎😎😎👍

That sounds interesting.

I cant find it tho, Do you have a link.

Thanks
TB

Offline Gustavo

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Re: Adventure tyres in particular Mitas E 07
« Reply #9 on: Jan 26, 2022, 05:00 PM »
*Originally Posted by Topbox [+]
I said I haven't ridden off road so far. But if I can get all my ducks in a row then Chile and Alaska here I come. Where paved roads are not guaranteed. AND, if they get muddy then with street tyres they will be impossible.

That is what project 650 is all about.

For European riding I'll take my Versys 1000.

TB

You can ride Chile to Alaska w/o needing anything more than street tires.  It really depends on how much time you have and what roads (or non-roads) you choose to explore.  If I understand correctly, and you have no off-road experience, the Versys 650, regardless of how modified it ends up being, isn't the best tool to explore those non-roads.  Everything else, whether paved, dry dirt or wet dirt, is still a road.  When you start going off-road, that's where the size, limitations of suspension/clearance and skills really make a difference. 

I've ridden a lot of dirt roads, dry and wet. 





The biggest problem you'll run into is not traction, but ability to evacuate the mud that sticks to the tires.  That's what really kills you on a street oriented bike with a low fender on muddy roads (and it can literally be a road, doesn't have top be very technical or rocky, just sticky mud).  Eventually, the front wheel and fender pack up and the front wheel stops spinning.  The next thing that happens is that you are sitting on your arse next to the bike wondering what the hell happened.  DAMHIK...   :22:  And that happens regardless of what tires you have.  The next thing to worry about is how well your Versys is setup to survive a small crash like that.  Because if your footpeg broke off, or your radiator got damaged, you aren't going to go very far.  The Versys footpeg stays are an especially unsuitable brittle aluminum that breaks just when you look at it wrong.  Again, DAMHIK...   :125:


Gustavo
Always yield to temptation, it may not pass your way again - Ken Morton